Directions on How to Make a Canopy for a Radio Wagon

By Nathanael Rittichier

There are few things as iconic of childhood as a Radio Flyer wagon. Radio wagons are a fun way for parents to take their children along on outdoor events. They are also a great way to keep an eye on your children at all times, and they make it easier to keep a quick walking pace. Weather is the one thing that can that can dampen this fun. Avoid the risks of having your children exposed to rain and extreme sunlight by making a canopy for your Radio wagon.

Measure the wagon to find the dimensions you will need for your canopy. The canopy is going to be one solid piece of cloth that makes up both the walls and the roof. Take this into account when figuring your cloth dimensions.

Add 2 inches to both the length and width of your measurements for the cloth. This will give you the needed length to create a 1/2-inch hem at the sides of your cloth. Cut the waterproof cloth to size.

Sew the 1/2-inch hem around all the edges of your cloth. For added reinforcement, double stitch the hem. Place a grommet at each corner of the cloth and in the middle of the edges that will run the length of the wagon.

Measure your tent poles and elbows, and cut them to fit. The tent poles are to be the frame of the canopy. Connect three tent poles to two elbows for one arch. You need three arches in total, each spanning the width of the wagon.

Drill two holes in the base of each tent pole, one on either side. Make sure the holes will face the long side of the wagon when set in place. Drill corresponding holes along both sides of the wagon.

Place the first arch in the wagon and bolt both bases to the wagon's edge with a hook bolt. Place the bolt in through the outside of the wagon so that the hook remains on the outside of the bed. Install your other two arches.

Drape your waterproof cloth over the arches. Slide a short piece of nylon cord through each grommet and tie it to its corresponding hook bolt.

Things You Will Need

  • Metal tent poles and elbows
  • Waterproof cloth
  • Needle and thread
  • Grommets and pliers
  • Scissors
  • Drill
  • Hook bolts and nuts
  • Nylon cord

About the Author

Nathanael Rittichier began writing in 1995. He received a Bachelor of Arts in telecommunications with emphasis on production and a minor in philosophy from Ball State University.