Delta Crib Instructions

By Mary Jo Megginson
Check to be sure your crib was not part of the recall.
Check to be sure your crib was not part of the recall.

Delta Children's Products has been manufacturing baby products since it was first incorporated in 1967. Delta was involved in two major crib recalls, one in 2008 and another in 2010, which primarily concerned malfunctions in drop-side cribs. Several models of cribs were not part of the recall, though, and do comply with current safety standards. Many Delta cribs can be assembled with no tools other than the included Allen wrench.

Assemble the Crib

Attach one of the crib sides to the two crib ends using four 6-by-38 mm bolts and an Allen wrench.

Fasten the mattress support with the warning label facing up to the four crib legs using four mattress support bolts and an Allen wrench. Choose one of three levels for the mattress support, depending which bolt holes you use. The top holes will keep the mattress in a raised position, which is only suitable for newborns.

Attach the last crib side using four 6-by-38 mm bolts and an Allen wrench.

Place the instruction sheet and Allen key in the pouch on the mattress support for easy access at a later time.

Convert to Toddler Bed

Move the mattress support to the lowest position by attaching it to the lowest bolt holes in the support legs using four mattress support bolts.

Remove one side of the crib by removing four 6-by-38 mm bolts using an Allen wrench.

Attach the stabilizer bar to the bottom bolt holes of the open side of the crib using four 6-by-38 mm bolts and an Allen wrench.

Tip

Instructions vary depending on the specific model of Delta crib you own. Instruction sheets can be downloaded from the Delta website.

Warning

The mattress you use with this crib must be 27 1/4 inches by 51 5/8 inches and no more than 6 inches thick. Stop using the crib when the infant reaches a height of 35 inches or is able to climb out on his own.

About the Author

Mary Jo Megginson has been writing since 1992 in academic and professional settings. Her experience ranges from writing policy documents and text panels for museums to technical writing for a major software company. She holds a Master of Arts in anthropology from McMaster University and a Master of Museum Studies from the University of Toronto.