How to Use I-Dog

By Si Kingston

The I-Dog robot can help your child develop a sense of responsibility. This toy requires attention from its owner, just like a real dog. When the I-Dog is ignored or not fed, it will become sad or bored. If the I-Dog is showered with love and attention, it will blossom and develop. This is reflected by a change in its personality. Based on the type of "food" and the amount of attention it receives, the I-Dog will become a happy, pleasant dog or a disgruntled pet.

Press the "Nose Button" to power on the I-Dog. When you first turn on the toy, it will be in puppy mode and will not have a personality. You must feed it music for it to develop.

Feed the I-Dog music in one of two ways. Plug end "A" of the I-Dog's connector cord into the side of the toy. Plug end "B" of the connector cord into the headphone jack of the musical device (e.g., stereo, CD player or MP3 player). Then press "Play" on the musical device. Or, instead of connecting the I-Dog to a musical device, play music through a set of speakers loud enough for the I-Dog to hear. When the I-Dog hears the music, it will dance. Allow the I-Dog to feed for at least five minutes every hour. It will then begin to develop a personality.

Double-click the "Nose Button" when the music is not playing to learn the I-Dog's mood. The I-Dog displays its mood through the LED pattern on its head. For example, if the light travels in a circle, stops and lights up the center LED, then travels in a circle again, the I-Dog is happy. If the pattern appears more random, the I-Dog is ecstatic or excited. The I-Dog will also display boredom, loneliness, sadness and sickness.

Pet the top of the I-Dog's head or wave your hand over the top of its head to give the I-Dog attention. The I-Dog's LED will blink a pinkish, purplish color when it requires attention. Giving the I-Dog attention will help to foster a good mood and help develop its personality.

About the Author

Si Kingston has been an online content contributor since 2004, with work appearing on websites such as MadeMan. She is a professional screenwriter and young-adult novelist and was awarded the Marion-Hood Boesworth Award for Young Fiction in 2008. Kingston holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Mills College.