How to Make a Morse Code Device

By Brandy Alexander
Now you can build your own telegraph device.
Now you can build your own telegraph device.

Just like Samuel Morse, you can also build your own telegraph machine that will allow you to press a button, sound a buzzer and light up a light bulb to communicate your message in Morse code. With a few items from an electronic supply store, you can build your own simple Morse code device that will be a great help in learning how to telegraph and send messages using only short or long tones.

Cut four lengths of wire to about 6 inches each and then remove 1/2 inch of shielding from the end of each.

Connect the end of one wire to the positive terminal on the 9-volt battery's wiring harness and twist them together with the other end of the wire connected to one of the two exposed wires from the light bulb socket.

Connect a second length of wire between the light bulb and the buzzer. Connect one end of the wire to the other exposed wire from the light bulb socket and the other end to one of the two wires from the buzzer.

Connect a third wire between the buzzer and the battery. Twist one end of this wire to the remaining wire from the buzzer and the other end to one of the terminals on the push button switch.

Connect the fourth and last wire between the switch and the battery. Twist one end of this wire to the other of the two terminals on the push button switch and the other end to the negative terminal on the battery.

Cover all exposed wires with a layer of electrical tape to prevent an electrical short. Connect the battery to the harness and push the button. When the button is pushed, the light will light up and the buzzer will sound. Practice making short and long sounds that correspond to the Morse code alphabet.

Things You Will Need

  • Wire cutters
  • Wire
  • Push button switch
  • 9-volt battery and harness
  • 9-volt buzzer
  • 9-volt light bulb and harness
  • Electrical tape

About the Author

Brandy Alexander began writing professionally in 1993. She has years of experience as a professional of the English language employed with the "Cape Times" and "The Mercury." Alexander holds a master's degree in English literature from Stellenbosch University in South Africa.