Grants to Boarding Schools for Troubled Boys

By Geoffrey St. Marie
Military schools often offer grants to students.
Military schools often offer grants to students.

Grants for troubled boys attending boarding school are hard to come by. This is because many grant and scholarship providers want children who excel in school, under the assumption they are better investments than kids challenged by emotional problems. Despite this imbalance, help is out there. Military schools offer the best chance for full grants, while other schools may offer partial scholarships. Outside loans are also an option.

Military School

Many military boarding schools offer full scholarships and/or grants. Often, the student may need to take a test to ensure eligibility. Parents can then rest easy knowing that all four years are covered and that their sons are entering a disciplined environment. If the young man does not pass the test, other loan options are available. This may involve what is termed a "deferred payment plan." Such loans vary by institution so parents need to contact school administrators to learn specifics. These loans generally cover 40 percent of the cost of tuition beginning in the second year.

Foundation Money

Although examples of this are not plentiful, some schools have foundation money that they give students in the form of grants and scholarships. One such case is the Little Keswick School in Virginia. The school offers scholarships to families that struggle with tuition.

Little Keswick Foundation for Special Education P.O. Box 722 Keswick, VA 22947 434-293-7981 littlekeswickschool.net

Clark Behavioral Health Financing

Many boarding schools and ranches collaborate with Clark Behavioral Health Financing. Clark is a major lender to schools for troubled teens and offer low interest rates and diverse loan packages. Enrollment, tuition and other fees are often covered by Clark loans, and repayment can be deferred from six to 10 months depending on the school. Clark gives a mind-saving alternative to re-mortgaging and other financial hardships that might be necessary in the absence of flexible loans.

Clark Behavioral Health Financing 510 S. 18th St. Coeur d'Alene, ID 83815 888-755-3079 clarkbhf.com

Friends of Families With Children in Crisis

Clark supports the nonprofit organization Friends of Families With Children in Crisis, which helps families whose children may not be able to stay in school due to financial hardship. As of 2010, the foundation was not able to provide financial assistance at the time of admission.

Friends of Families With Children in Crisis P.O. Box 825 Lake Arrowhead, CA 92352 951.315.8320 friendsoffamilies.org

About the Author

Geoffrey St. Marie began writing professionally in 2010, with his work focusing on topics in history, culture, politics and society. He received his Bachelor of Arts in European history from Central Connecticut State University and his Master of Arts in modern European history from Brown University.