Trampolines

Instructions for Putting Up a Trampoline Net

Preventing Injuries

Before installing your trampoline, ensure the trampoline is away from trees and other obstacles that children may hit while jumping. Keep the trampoline away from walls or other enclosures.

Once you have installed your trampoline, install a good safety net around the trampoline. Installing a trampoline enclosure will take a few people to ensure proper installation. Make sure you have at least one or two people to help with this project.

Purchase the trampoline enclosure at any sporting goods store or Wal Mart that will fit the dimensions of your trampoline because trampolines come in various sizes and are generally either round or square in shape. Ensure you have the proper tools to install. You need a wrench, nuts, brackets, and bolts. All but the wrench should be included in your trampoline kit.

Installing your Trampoline Enclosure Poles

Trampoline net kits come with a net and usually at least eight high and low poles, ropes and most everything you need to install an enclosure, according to essortment.com. (See Reference 1)

To begin, insert the upper smaller poles into the lower larger poles, which will usually have notches on one of the ends of the pole. The notched poles are the tops of the pole, which you will attach to the legs of your trampoline. Align the screw holes and insert the screws, and tighten screws in all the poles, according to trampolineonly. (See Reference 2) Your trampoline kit has enough foam tubes to place two over all of the pole assemblies if they are not already in place in the kit. Place the foam tubes over all of the poles beginning with the upper poles. Place the pole caps or balls on top of each pole. The tops have notches where the webbing is attached.

Installing the Enclosure

Spread out the net or mesh and insert the webbed portion of the net into each pole top, and make a square knot on each pole. Stretch out the net portion and look for straps or ties that you will tie to the poles. The poles should have three areas where you attach the netting. Tie the netting to each pole working clockwise until you are back at the beginning, or entrance point.

Many kits have nets with an entrance point included and marked and may have a zipper. Others may simply have an extra tie point so children can get in and out by untying to enter and tying once they are on the trampoline.

After tying the net to the poles, tie a knot from each of the poles to the frame of the trampoline, again working clockwise. Square knots are very strong knots and should be used for all knots called for in the trampoline enclosure kit.

After several uses, check the trampoline and all of the components to ensure that they are in good shape. Replace them if they look worn or ripped in areas.

Consumer Product Safety Review of Trampolines

Injury Statistics

Children 4 and under totaled 15,541 of a total 109,522 injuries.
Children 4 and under totaled 15,541 of a total 109,522 injuries.

The CPSC’s Summer 2007 Consumer Product Safety Review listed 109,522 trampoline injuries. Children 4 and under totaled 15,541, while 71,265 were children ages 5 to 14. These figures are based on U.S. emergency room visits alone. Between 1990 and 2001, CPSC received six reports of trampoline related deaths of children under age 15.

Common Injuries

CPSC data indicates three-quarters of trampoline injuries involve fractures to the lower arm or lower leg.
CPSC data indicates three-quarters of trampoline injuries involve fractures to the lower arm or lower leg.

CPSC data indicates three-quarters of trampoline injuries involve fractures to the lower arm or lower leg. Of all reported injuries as of 1996, approximately 40 percent of trampoline injuries were to the knee, ankle or foot. About 30 percent were to the elbow, wrist or hand. Of all non-fracture injuries, sprains and strains accounted for 40 percent. Head injuries accounted for 12 percent.

Hazard Patterns

The majority of incidents occurred due to colliding with another person on the trampoline.
The majority of incidents occurred due to colliding with another person on the trampoline.

In September 1995, CPSC investigated 82 incidents and discovered that 46 percent of trampoline injuries occurred on backyard trampolines less than two years old. The majority of incidents occurred due to colliding with another person on the trampoline, landing improperly while jumping on or off the trampoline, or falling on the trampoline springs or frame.

Recalls

Trampoline recalls happen each year due to manufacturing defects that cause risk of injury. Skywalker Holdings recalled 60,000 trampolines in May 2009. In April 2009, 668,000 InMotion mini-trampolines were recalled. In March 2009, Aviva Sports recalled 14,000 trampolines. More trampoline recalls can be found at Cpsc.gov.

Safety Tips

To help prevent serious injury, CPSC recommends to always supervise children on trampolines.
To help prevent serious injury, CPSC recommends to always supervise children on trampolines.

To help prevent serious injury, CPSC recommends to always supervise children on trampolines, not to allow children under age 6 on a full-sized trampoline, and allowing only one person on the trampoline at a time.

Instructions for a Trampoline Safety Enclosure

Connect the enclosure poles to the trampoline base. This can be done in a few different ways. The poles will either be attached directly to the top of the base, by sliding the pole onto the top of a base leg, or by clamping the pole to the base legs using U-clamps.

Slide the foam padding onto the enclosure poles, then put on the top plastic caps if separate from the poles. Some poles have the top caps pre-installed.

Get on the trampoline with the net, and roll the net out so you can find the door. The door may be a zipper doorway shaped hole, or an overlap of netting with a space between to get in.

Position the doorway on the area of the trampoline where you want to enter, between two of the enclosure poles.

Secure the netting all around the bottom of the trampoline diameter, where the springs meet the trampoline pad. Start at the doorway, then move clockwise as you secure the netting. The netting will have straps or loops at the bottom to be hooked onto the trampoline pad metal loops. The trampoline pad loops may be horseshoe-shaped or triangular-shaped depending on the model.

Hold up the two top netting straps that flank the netting doorway, and position the netting doorway squarely between the two enclosure poles that you designated as the doorway.

Secure the netting straps into the top of each enclosure pole, through the guide holes on the plastic cap. These may be hook-and-loop fasteners or button-style straps. Fit the strap through the guide hole on each plastic cap starting from the doorway and continue clockwise until all are secure.

Tip

Ensue that you read your trampoline enclosure instruction manual as all models may differ slightly.

Warning

Always ensure that your children are supervised while jumping on a trampoline. If your child has friends that want to jump on the trampoline, ensure that you have permission from their parents prior to allow them to jump. Not doing so could result in a lawsuit if a child is injured while jumping on your property.

How to tie down a trampoline

Place one anchor and one length of rope on the ground at the middle of each trampoline leg.

Twist the anchor clockwise until it is difficult to move. Insert the crowbar into the eye of the anchor to increase leverage, and rotate clockwise until the eye of the anchor is all that remains above ground, with the open end of the eye facing away from the trampoline.

Loop one end of the rope over the trampoline spring rail, under the leg support, and through the eye of the ground anchor. Tie the two ends of the rope to secure the trampoline to the anchor.

Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for each leg to secure the trampoline to all four ground anchors.

Tip

If you do not have a crowbar, any strong, straight object that fits into the eye of the ground anchor will work. For a more permanent solution, sink the ground anchors into concrete.

How to Assemble a Trampoline Enclosure

Fasten the enclosure to the trampoline legs. The pole's bottom should be a foot and a half beneath the trampoline's frame. Since every trampoline is different, read the instruction manual for your specific design. Most enclosure poles clasp easily to the legs of the trampoline with stainless or galvanised U-bolts, washers and nuts.

Use your ladder to attach the top of the poles to the ones that have already been fastened to the trampoline legs. If you have two halves, align the holes of each half and use your screwdriver to insert and tighten screws. Most poles come in two halves, though a few will come as single-pole units.

Pull the foam sleeves over the poles. They should extend to the top of the trampoline frame. The enclosure set comes with a set of caps that should be placed on the tops of the poles. These will be used to hold the encompassing net.

Tie one end of the enclosure net on top of one pole, then stretch it over and tie it to the top of the pole beside it. Continue this procedure and tie the net around the poles until it fully encloses the trampoline. Once you have done this, the net should be hanging just above the trampoline. Pull it down and clamp it to the top of the frame.