Teen Pregnancy

How to Start a Teen Pregnancy Support Group

Develop a mission statement and goals for your teen pregnancy support group. Decide what the purpose of the group is, spelling it out specifically. Create clear objectives -- such as providing emotional support to pregnant teens, giving teen moms the opportunity to socialize with their peers or helping teen moms to learn parenting skills.

Find a meeting place for your support group. Ask local community centers, religious institutions or schools if you can use a meeting room or classroom for free once a week.

Advertise your group, reaching out to your target audience -- pregnant teens. Type up a flier to hang up at local OB offices and community clinics. Post your group's events and activities on social media and other websites.

Invite guest speakers to your support group. Fill a few slots with expert advisers in child development, baby care or other issues that affect teen moms before actually starting the group sessions. Advertise these speakers on your flier or a website.

Secure funding from outside sources to pay for your speakers, refreshments or promotional materials. Research your funding options, and ask community organizations -- such as local religious institutions -- if they care to donate.

Warning

Get permission to advertise your group before leaving fliers out or hanging up a poster. Don't just assume that it's acceptable or allowed to advertise your group at the local doctor's office or at your teen's school. Avoid acting overly "preachy," as this may scare off the girls. Don't allow any bullying. A teen pregnancy group should include a caring and supportive environment, and never a judgmental one.

Programs to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative

The CDC and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health have partnered to form an initiative to prevent teen pregnancy. Its goals are to reduce pregnancy and birth rates, to make services readily available to pregnant teens, to increase links between clinical services and prevention programs and to increase education about teen pregnancy.

UT Teen Health

The University of Texas in San Antonio provides a teen health program aimed at adolescents, high school students, adults and parents. It offers medically accurate, culturally relevant and age-appropriate information regarding sex, pregnancy and prevention. It reaches out to teens and their families through the media, by having a teen advisory board and offers a sex education program through the Health Sciences Center.

Hartford Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative

The Hartford Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative in Connecticut offers information to teens, their families and the community regarding reproduction, prevention and making informed decisions. The program links to other community and national resources and works with community outreach programs and health centers. It provides emergency contraception, mental health services, STI testing and treatment, pregnancy testing, and information on abortion and birth control.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Inc.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Inc. in Gainesville, Georgia, focuses on providing age-appropriate counseling and support services. It offers a ninth-grade classroom program that encourages safe and healthy relationships and assists teens in making positive choices. It also offers separate programs for girls and boys. It provides programs to encourage completion of school and has sessions with sixth-graders on sex and pregnancy to encourage communication between parents and their kids.