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How to Make Letters Out of Legos

By Melanie Jo Triebel ; Updated April 18, 2017
Building letters from Legos can be a fun way to help children learn to spell.

Many Lego enthusiasts delight in complex construction projects that last for days. The simple projects, however, can be just as rewarding. Creating letters from Legos, whether to form a complete alphabet, a word, or a sentence, is just such a project. Design and construction is simple. But the impact as a decoration or whimsical message can be significant.

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Choose a size for your letters. They should be at least five bricks tall, so that there is room to build the curves and lines needed for each. The larger your letters, the better you will be able to approximate curves.

Plan your layout. For straight vertical lines (such as the sides of a capital “H”) place bricks of equal length directly on top of one another. For straight horizontal lines, use a longer brick that can be connected to any vertical lines. For example, the vertical sides of your capital “H” could be composed of bricks two circles long, while the horizontal line is a brick six circles long, with the two circles on each end snapped into the vertical sides. For curves and diagonal lines, use bricks of the same length but snap each brick one circle over from the brick above and below.

Snap the bricks together in your planned layout. Use bricks of a uniform width, such as the Lego standard two-circle width.

Tip

Play with color in constructing your Lego letters. You can make each letter a single color, use a random mix of colors, or create a repeating pattern within each letter.

For smaller children, the Lego's Duplo line offers a “Play with Letters” set with large, easy-to-manipulate blocks with letters emblazoned on the side.

For children learning to spell, Lego Education offers a set of letters on flat tiles that can be snapped onto a white Lego base in various orders to create words and sentences.

Warning

Lego toys contain many small pieces that can be dangerous or deadly if swallowed by infants or small children.

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About the Author

Melanie Jo Triebel has been writing since 2003. Her articles have appeared in such publications as the "ARIAS U.S. Quarterly" and the "Sidley Reinsurance Law Report." Triebel holds a B.A. in music from Chapman University and a J.D. from the Chapman University School of Law. She has practiced law for nearly a decade and is licensed in California and Illinois.

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