How to Make Fire Hula Hoops

By Zeus Tyrone Mendoza

Hula hoops are toys which can be spun around your body, traditionally on your waist. They can be used with different techniques, however, such as spinning them around your leg or your arm. One modification which makes hula hoop techniques flashy is adding fire. Fire hula hoops are hoops with wicks that point out to the sides that will ignite when lit. With the right tools and proper items, you can make your own fire hula hoop.

Measure the distance for each hole with a measuring tape for each of the four wicks, then mark them on the hoop. You should make four equidistant marks in total. The distance between each hole will be the overall circumference of your hula hoop divided by four.

Use a 1/4 inch drill bit to drill each marked hole on the hoop. Use a level tool to ensure that the wicks will be inserted straight into the hoop, and not stick out at an angle (when the hoop is laying flat on the ground, the wicks will stick out parallel to the floor).

Fold each wick with a cathedral fold (sample of folds under resource). You can also use a modified cathedral fold in which the wick is folded into a triangle. Any number of folding methods will work as well, but the cathedral method works best.

Put each wick on the end of a threaded rod and fasten them with the nuts and washers. First, put a washer and nut onto the rod, then put the wick onto the rod, and finally fasten the last washer and nut on top of the wick. Ensure that the nuts are tightened to fasten the wick in place.

Put nuts and washers on the ends of each rod, opposite of the wick. Insert the rods into each hole, tightening the nuts after insertion. Secure the rods by wrapping electrical tape around the connection to make sure that the rod with ignited wick does not come loose and injure somebody during your hula hoop session.

About the Author

Zeus Tyrone Mendoza is an award-winning and accomplished freelance writer from California. Mendoza has contributed works published in "Kerygma" magazine, "Philippine Star Newspaper," and the monthly newsletter for the world renowned GK Community Development Foundation. Mendoza holds a B.A. in English creative writing from California State University, Northridge.