How to Fold Playhut Tents

By Lauren Thompson

Playhut is a brand of children's flexible, self-erecting tents that come in colorful and licensed designs. Some models are designed to fit over the top of a child's bed, while others are stand-alone tent structures suitable for setup in a backyard or large playroom. The tents are made of a lightweight canvas material that is sewn over a springy, flexible tent structure. The springy tent supports and joints makes the tent easy to construct and store in a small space.

Remove any accessories from the tent, such as a cover or a battery pack. Remove the tent from a bed, if it is attached to one, by unfastening the strips that hold the tent to the bed support poles.

Place the tent on the floor or ground. Push the two largest panels, such as the two longest walls or the top and bottom of the tent, toward each other.

Push other panels together to flatten any smaller sidewalls. Fold the sidewalls into the tent so that the tent lies completely flat.

Step on the bottom of the folded Playhut and bend the top down to put the tent in a "C" shape, with the opening facing your legs.

At the top curve of the "C" shape of the tent, grasp the flexible support beams along the side of the tent with both hands. Simultaneously cross your left hand under your right hand and twist your thumbs inward to force the flexible support beams to bend into a circular formation and completely collapse the rest of the tent's structure into three hoops.

Grasp the hoops together in your hands and store in a space where the tent cannot erect itself, such as behind a dresser or under a storage box.

Tip

Playhut recommends storing their tents flat for extended storage. If you wish to flatten the tent for storage, skip steps 4-6.

These instructions work for Playhut bed tents, mega tents and playhouse structures. Games and other Playhut structures have different folding instructions. Consult your manual or the manufacturer's website for instructions on collapsing these items.

Warning

While folding the tent, it may spring back at you. Use care and work slowly to avoid the tent's springing action, which could cause the panels to hit you.

About the Author

Lauren Thompson lives in Kansas City, Missouri and works as both a writer and freelancer. Her background is in technical and spec writing for the information technology industry, as well as financial services. She also writes opinion and editorial articles for KCParent and Parents Edge, specializing in entertainment, food and political realms.