Radio Flyer Wagon Assembly Instructions

By Diana Waterston
Radio Flyer wagons can last from generation to generation.
Radio Flyer wagons can last from generation to generation.

Since 1917, Radio Flyer has been producing iconic wagons for children. Founded by Italian immigrant Antonio Pasin, the first wagons were wooden and called Liberty Coasters after the Statue of Liberty. Pasin named his first steel wagon the Radio Flyer because of his fascination with two modern inventions of the 1930s: radios and airplanes. The classic red wagon has been in continuous production since 1935. Through the years, Radio Flyer has produced wagons that matched 1970s muscle cars, all-terrain wagons, and wagons with cup holders, canopies and even seatbelts.

Place the metal turning mechanism so that its four feet are facing downward. Put three drops of oil around the center hole.

Push the 3/8 inch bolt with the hole through its thread into one of the circular metal plates, then up through the bottom of the turning mechanism. Place the triangular front wheel axle onto the bolt end so that the circular depressions line up against each other.

Place the second circular metal plate on top of the bolt followed by a locking nut. Tighten the nut with an adjustable wrench until it is snug. Push the cotter pin into the hole in the bolt. Bend the cotter ends apart.

Turn the wagon body upside down. Align the front wheel axle with the four holes in the front of the wagon body. Secure the axle using four 1/4-inch bolts and handle nuts with a flat head screwdriver and wrench.

Slide a rear brace onto each side of the rear axle. Secure the rear axle to the back of the wagon body with two 1/4-inch bolts and handle nuts. Secure the ends of the rear brace to the wagon body using two 1/4-inch bolts and handle nuts.

Slide a wheel onto each of the four axles: two in the front and two in the back. Hammer a hub cab onto the rod protruding from the middle of each wheel.

Turn the wagon right side up. Insert the handle into the safety ball. Slide the safety ball into the front of the turning mechanism. Secure the handle and safety ball to the turning mechanism with the long screw and a handle nut.

Tip

Assemble the wagon on a soft but firm surface to avoid scratching the paint.

Warning

Never use a wagon near steps, swimming pools, sloped driveways, roadways, steep hills or motor vehicles. Always wear shoes when playing with a wagon.

About the Author

Diana Waterston has been writing professionally since 1994. Her work has appeared in "Conde Nast Traveler," "Pregnancy" magazine and "NY Metro Parents." She has also produced segments for "Good Morning America," "CBS Early Show" and Fox Business Network. Waterston graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor's degree in English.