Consumer Product Safety Review of Trampolines

By Amy Derby
Consumer Product Safety Review of Trampolines

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has been investigating trampoline injuries for over a decade. Common especially in summer months, trampoline injuries account for over 100,000 hospital visits annually. Trampoline recalls occur each year, often after reported injuries, due to defective manufacturing. CPSC urges caregivers to do what they can to help keep children from getting hurt on trampolines.

Injury Statistics

Children 4 and under totaled 15,541 of a total 109,522 injuries.

The CPSC’s Summer 2007 Consumer Product Safety Review listed 109,522 trampoline injuries. Children 4 and under totaled 15,541, while 71,265 were children ages 5 to 14. These figures are based on U.S. emergency room visits alone. Between 1990 and 2001, CPSC received six reports of trampoline related deaths of children under age 15.

Common Injuries

CPSC data indicates three-quarters of trampoline injuries involve fractures to the lower arm or lower leg.

CPSC data indicates three-quarters of trampoline injuries involve fractures to the lower arm or lower leg. Of all reported injuries as of 1996, approximately 40 percent of trampoline injuries were to the knee, ankle or foot. About 30 percent were to the elbow, wrist or hand. Of all non-fracture injuries, sprains and strains accounted for 40 percent. Head injuries accounted for 12 percent.

Hazard Patterns

The majority of incidents occurred due to colliding with another person on the trampoline.

In September 1995, CPSC investigated 82 incidents and discovered that 46 percent of trampoline injuries occurred on backyard trampolines less than two years old. The majority of incidents occurred due to colliding with another person on the trampoline, landing improperly while jumping on or off the trampoline, or falling on the trampoline springs or frame.

Recalls

Trampoline recalls happen each year due to manufacturing defects that cause risk of injury. Skywalker Holdings recalled 60,000 trampolines in May 2009. In April 2009, 668,000 InMotion mini-trampolines were recalled. In March 2009, Aviva Sports recalled 14,000 trampolines. More trampoline recalls can be found at Cpsc.gov.

Safety Tips

To help prevent serious injury, CPSC recommends to always supervise children on trampolines.

To help prevent serious injury, CPSC recommends to always supervise children on trampolines, not to allow children under age 6 on a full-sized trampoline, and allowing only one person on the trampoline at a time.

About the Author

Amy Derby is a writer from Chicago. She will graduate from Ashford University in 2016 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism and mass communication and a minor in criminal justice.