How to Make a Junior Girl Scout First Aid Kit

By Miska Rynsburger
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For more than 90 years, the Girl Scouts of America has been shaping the lives of girls for the better. Through an amazing array of activities girls learn courage, confidence and character. Girl Scouting has helped girls build a stronger sense of who they are, and how they can contribute to this world in a positive way. If your young Girl Scout is learning about first aid, help her prepare a Girl Scout first aid kit so she'll be prepared in an emergency

Prepare a container for the first aid supplies. Use a plastic container with a lid, a metal lunch box or a fabric roll-out container. Encourage your child to decorate a plastic or metal container with stickers or paint, if desired.

Prepare for cuts and scrapes by packing a good variety of bandages. Adhesive bandages of various sizes and shapes are needed to cover most surface wounds. Pack sterile gauze pads, wet wipes, antiseptic and antibiotic ointment and a roll of hypoallergenic tape. A tensor bandage may be needed for possible sprains or muscle strains. Non-latex gloves should be included for handling wounds.

Keep several simple tools on hand, in case of emergency. A small pair of quality scissors, tweezers and safety pins, may all be helpful in a pinch. Include a thermometer to keep track of fevers.

Pack sunscreen lotion, to ward off the sun's harmful rays. Aloe Vera lotion is soothing after a long day in the woods. Include lip balm and a small container of petroleum jelly. Several cotton balls are a good way to apply these various lotions. Biodegradable soap should be included as well.

Include several medicines in the first aid kit. Aspirin are helpful for minor aches and pains. Antacid and antidiarrheal, for times the trail food doesn't sit right. Remember a first aid guide which may be a helpful reference, when scouts are struck with an unexpected emergency.

Things You Will Need

  • Container (plastic, metal or fabric)
  • Adhesive bandages
  • Gauze pads
  • Hypoallergenic tape
  • Tensor bandage
  • Wet wipes
  • Antiseptic
  • Antibacterial ointment
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Safety pin
  • Needle
  • Thread
  • Thermometer
  • Sunscreen
  • Aloe Vera lotion
  • Lip balm
  • Cotton balls
  • Petroleum Jelly
  • Biodegradable soap
  • Aspirin
  • Antidiarrheal pills
  • Antacid
  • First aid guide
  • Non-latex gloves

About the Author

Miska Rynsburger began her career as a writer in 2009 by authoring a book titled "It's Time to Play Outside." She is a former elementary school teacher turned stay-at-home mom and freelance writer. Miska holds a Bachelor of Arts in humanities from Hope College and a master's degree in educational leadership from Grand Valley State University.