Jobs for Kids Ages 10 to 12

By Amy Phoenix ; Updated April 18, 2017
Kids can work in the garden.
Kids can work in the garden.

Kids love having money to spend on their unique interests. As a child demonstrates increasing responsibility around ages 10 to 12, job opportunities multiply. Child labor laws in the United States prohibit jobs that take too much time, but kids can still earn money, learn skills and save up for purchases.

Skills

Kids ages 10 to 12 have many skills they could use or share in a job. They also may want to learn new skills they can use later in life. A child who has experience in yard work may enjoy mowing lawns, raking leaves, shoveling snow, landscaping, planting or weeding a garden and chopping wood. Kids who can type quickly and use a computer may like typing papers for others. A child who is eager to learn a skill such as childcare can begin as mother’s helper.

Interests

List the child’s interests and consider what jobs might fulfill them. The job that makes a kid’s heart sing will match the child's interests. Kids who love animals may enjoy taking pictures of people’s pets as a job or starting a dog walking service. Children who love to swim or ride bikes can offer to teach younger kids for a fee. Kids who love to be outside or who love cars may want to start a car washing business during warm weather. Crafty kids may make bracelets, beaded lizards or other imaginative creations; they can sell them to friends and family and offer them at neighborhood garage sales or community bazaars. Organized children may want to start a housekeeping business for people they know.

Time

Consider the amount of time a potential job would take to complete. Kids may want to earn money, but they also need time to be kids. If they choose a job they like, most 10- to 12-year-old kids will find fun in the job instead of feeling like they have grown up way too fast. Allocate time that works for the kid and for the whole family.

Resources

Some jobs for kids require resources such as start-up money, materials or supplies. Making bracelets will require beads and thread. A car washer will need a hose, bucket, sunscreen and soap. Babysitting may require training or CPR certification. Consider all the resources that will be needed.

About the Author

Amy Phoenix began writing professionally in 2005. Her work has appeared in various online publications, including Mothering. Phoenix is a certified parent educator, trained meditation facilitator, and enjoys writing about natural health, parenting, spirituality, and organization.