What Jobs Can 13 Year Olds Get?

By Felicia Nelson
Teens can earn extra spending money by growing produce or making crafts.
Teens can earn extra spending money by growing produce or making crafts.

The Fair Labor Standards Act prohibits children younger than 14 years old from obtaining a job. However, that doesn’t stop them from earning their own income. There are many ways a 13 year old can earn her own money and achieve a sense of accomplishment. Letting a teen earn her own money now will put her on the right track for good work ethic in the future.

Grow Local Produce

If your teen has a green thumb, encourage him to put it to good use. If you have space in your backyard, start a garden. Have him pick the type of produce to grow, plant seeds, tend the garden, water the plants and pull the weeds. When the fruits and vegetables are grown, help your child take his bounty to the farmer’s market to sell to the public. Check with your local agricultural department beforehand for local requirements to sell produce.

Create Homemade Items

Beaded jewelry and painted crafts are easy to make and sell at flea markets, fairs and online. If your child has a creative flair, help her turn her passion into profit. Buy her the things she needs to complete her projects, but let her know that the cost of materials will be recouped after she has sold her projects. Determine prices for her wares that cover the cost of materials and allow her a percentage of profit per item.

Babysitting

If your teen is mature enough to watch younger kids for short periods of time, than he could make extra income by babysitting. Let family and friends know that your child wants to earn some extra spending money and is offering babysitting services during days and evenings before curfew. Ask the parents of the child your teen babysits to leave contact numbers to reach them in case of an emergency.

Mowing Lawns

Put the push mower sitting in the garage to good use by letting your child mow neighbors' lawns. Teach your child the proper handling of a lawn mower before you let him venture off into his new summer career. Show him how to start and stop a mower, and inform him of the dangers of being too close to the blades while the mower is running.

About the Author

Based in Nelsonville, Ohio, Felicia Nelson has been writing since 2007, covering a variety of business and personal finance topics. She is pursuing a bachelor's degree in digital communications at Franklin University.