How to Remove A&D; Ointment From a Couch

By Elizabeth Otto

A&D ointment is a cream for diaper rash that contains a blend of skin-protecting ingredients, several of which can leave an oily reside on fabrics, including petrolatum, cod liver oil, lanolin, mineral oil and paraffin wax. Removing A&D from a couch or other upholstered piece can be tricky, and cleaning may need to be repeated several times to completely remove stains.

Use a butter knife to scrape excess ointment from the fabric. Wipe the knife clean after each pass. Repeat until you have scraped off as much ointment from the couch as possible.

Sprinkle the ointment stain with cornstarch, salt or talcum powder. Cover the stain completely with the substance of your choice, and rub it into the stain with your fingertips. Leave the powder on the stain until it absorbs the grease from the ointment. The powder should darken and crumble, indicating grease has been absorbed.

Brush the powder from the couch with a soft scrub brush. Remove all of the powder and inspect the couch to see if a stain remains.

Treat any remaining stain by mixing one tablespoon of grease-cutting dish detergent into one quart of warm water. Mix until lofty bubbles have formed. Place bubbles on a clean, damp rag, and work into the stain. Use a circular motion and repeat until the entire stain has been treated. Rinse with fresh, warm water and allow to air dry.

Inspect the couch for any remaining stain once it's dry. Treat again if necessary.

Tip

Upholstery cleaner may remove ointment stains. Try one that is formulated to remove greasy stains. Vinegar may be used to treat greasy stains. Apply one to two tablespoons of straight vinegar to a clean, dry rag, and rub into ointment stain. Rinse with fresh, warm water.

About the Author

Elizabeth Otto has been writing professionally since 2003. She is a licensed emergency medical technician-intermediate with over 10 years of experience in the field. She has worked as a clinical assistant in family health and emergency medicine since 1995. Otto is a freelance writer for various websites and holds an Associate of Science in medical assisting from Commonwealth College.