How to Use Aloe Vera on Newborns

By Racquel Ricci
The leaves of the aloe plant are filled with a gel that is beneficial for skin ailments.
The leaves of the aloe plant are filled with a gel that is beneficial for skin ailments.

The aloe vera plant is a succulent perennial plant used for a wide variety of ailments. The leaves are picked from the plant and the gel inside the leaves is used to create salves, juices, creams and even pills. Aloe vera is a natural supplement that can be used on newborns after consulting your physician. Although it is natural, your infant may still have allergic reactions to natural substances, so try a small amount of aloe before using it on large portions of the body or for ingestion.

Rub pure aloe vera gel on your infant's rashes. Aloe vera soothes irritated skin. Infants and babies are prone to skin rashes due to diapers, exposure to detergents and sensitive skin reactions. Aloe vera gel feels cool when applied to skin, and helps relieve skin irritation. Gently apply pure aloe vera gel to irritated areas by rubbing gently until the aloe is absorbed. The gel may not absorb entirely, but it is okay to leave a small layer of the gel on the skin and place clothing or diapers over the gel.

Add small amounts of aloe vera juice to an infant's or child's juice. Aloe vera juice is sold at most grocery stores and has been shown to help soothe an upset digestive tract. If your child has an upset stomach, read the label on the aloe vera juice container and add the recommended amount of juice to your child's regular juice. Aloe vera juice is made from the gel of the plant but, although it is natural, always consult your pediatrician before administering aloe vera juice to your child.

Apply gel to sun-burned skin. Aloe vera gel helps to re-moisturize sunburned and dehydrated skin. The gel helps soothe the pain associated with sunburn and protects the skin, which allows damaged skin to heal quicker than if you do not use aloe vera gel. Rub the gel gently over burned areas of the skin several times a day.

About the Author

Racquel Ricci began writing in 1999, and has since worked as a grant writer for non-profit organizations and public school systems. She runs competetively and writes often about exercise and fitness. Ricci has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of New Mexico in psychology.