How to Treat Hemorrhoids in a Child

Millions of Americans suffer from hemorrhoids, according to the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Although hemorrhoids are most common after age 30, some children experience these enlarged, bulging blood vessels located in and around the anus and lower rectum. Hemorrhoids often cause bleeding during bowel movements, as well as itching, sensitivity or pain around the anus. A child with hemorrhoids might see blood on the toilet paper after a bowel movement. In most cases, at-home remedies can treat hemorrhoids, but severe hemorrhoids require medical attention in a doctor’s office.

Have your child take a daily warm bath, washing the anal area with warm water. Soap can irritate the hemorrhoids 1. Dry with a hair dryer.

Help your child soak the anal area in plain warm water for 10 to 15 minutes two to three times a day. Dry the area with a hair dryer.

Instruct your child, or help him, wipe the anal area with plain, unscented, moist towelettes, baby wipes or wet toilet paper after a bowel movement.

Ice the anus with a cold compresses, and give the appropriate child’s dose of acetaminophen to relieve pain.

Ask your child’s doctor about using an over-the-counter hemorrhoid cream on the affected area, and follow the doctor’s instructions for use.

Tips

Often, a diet lacking in fiber is too blame for hemorrhoids. If your child has frequent constipation, strains during bowel movements or spends long periods on the toilet, diet is the likely culprit. Add more foods high in fiber in the child’s diet, such as fresh fruits, leafy vegetables, whole-grain breads and whole-grain cereals. Ensure that your child drinks eight glasses of water a day. Remind your child to use the restroom as soon as he feels a bowel movement coming. Waiting to use the bathroom makes hemorrhoids worse.

Warnings

If the hemorrhoids don’t improve within two weeks, or severe bleeding occurs, contact a doctor.

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