How to Submit a Child to Modeling Agents

By Zora Hughes
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To you, your little one is the most adorable child in the whole world, and you think her cherubic face belongs on every parenting and kids' clothing magazine in the country. Before you start dreaming of your child's modeling success, think long and hard about everything that comes with it. It takes an enormous amount of time, effort and the possibility of missing school and play time with friends. Your child also needs to be outgoing, love the camera and easily warm to strangers. Properly submitting your child's photos to reputable modeling agencies is the first step.

Step 1

Research and look for only the top reputable modeling agencies in your area that accept children. There are a great many scams and shady companies that will either try to get money from you or do not have the reputation or clout to get your child jobs. Do a business background check and look into the professional jobs that the agency has booked for their clients to ensure they are legitimate.

Step 2

Take natural photos of your child. Professional modeling agencies want to see children acting like children, according to Dee Ann Vernon of the Kim Dawson Agency in Dallas, Texas. Avoid using any props like sunglasses in the pictures, however. Take both close-up shots of your child's face, as well as whole body shots. Do not pay for professional photographs. Not only will you waste your money, most modeling agencies do not want them for new submissions.

Step 3

Send your child's picture with your contact information to the agency. You should also include your her age, height and measurements. Most reputable agencies will want you to submit the pictures through the mail, but some prefer email. Check with the agency to know exactly what it prefers.

Step 4

Do not follow up. The agencies will absolutely contact you if they are interested in seeing your child. Attempting to call will either get you nowhere, or will land your child's picture in the rejection bin. Some companies may send you a rejection letter, but others may not send anything at all, as they are too busy to reply to every single submission. Depending on the agency, you may be able to get your photos back if you include a self-addressed envelope when you submit them.

About the Author

Based in Los Angeles, Zora Hughes has been writing travel, parenting, cooking and relationship articles since 2010. Her work includes writing city profiles for Groupon. She also writes screenplays and won the S. Randolph Playwriting Award in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in television writing/producing and a Master of Arts Management in entertainment media management, both from Columbia College.