How to Stop a Toddler From Falling Out of Bed

By Cassandra Scheidies
young girl in bed image by les sanders from Fotolia.com

BabyCorner.com suggests that when a child begins to climb out of his crib or becomes 36 inches tall, switching to a toddler bed may provide the best sleep option -- it allows your child to take a step toward independence and growing up. However, some parents may have concerns that their toddler will fall out of a regular bed. Precautions allow the toddler to transition to another bed without causing the parents too much anxiety.

Put the mattress on the floor when transitioning from a crib to a bed. BabyCorner.com suggests this method as a way to get your toddler used to a regular bed without worrying that she'll fall onto the floor.

Get a toddler bed. Toddler beds often sit lower to the ground, keeping the toddler from falling out of the bed, according to Parents.com. They also typically use crib mattresses, saving parents a little money. Purchase a bed built in a kid-friendly shape, such as a castle or a race car, so your toddler will enjoy sleeping in it.

Add guardrails on the side of the bed to keep your toddler from falling out, recommends KidsHealth.org. They will also keep your child from climbing out of bed. When your child shows that he can sleep in the bed without falling out, remove the guardrails.

Move the bed next to the wall to keep your child from falling out of the bed. Try to find an area in the room that has a barrier on both sides for added protection.

Practice sleeping. When she starts to make the transition to a toddler bed, your child may have trouble getting used to the idea of not sleeping in a crib. Practice tucking the child in and having her sleep in the bed to help her learn how to sleep without falling and make her less scared of staying in the bed all night.

About the Author

Cassandra Scheidies has been writing professionally since 1997. Her work has appeared in "The Kearney Hub" newspaper and "Chicken Soup for the Preteen Soul." She holds a Master of Arts in mental health counseling from Denver Seminary.