Signs and Symptoms of Pregnancy After a Miscarriage

By Jane Williams
pregnant woman image by Valentin Mosichev from Fotolia.com

A miscarriage is a heartbreaking experience, and most losses occur within the first three months of pregnancy, many happening before the woman even knows she is pregnant. It is very possible to conceive again and go on to have an uneventful pregnancy. Health care providers recommend waiting a few cycles to encourage healing and increase the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

Implantation Bleeding

One of the very earliest pregnancy signs is one that not every woman experiences or even notices. About a week or so after fertilization, the embryo attaches to the wall of the uterus. This sometimes results in a small amount of bleeding, seen as a spot of blood on the toilet tissue. Cramping may accompany the spotting, leading some women to believe their period is on its way.

Tender Breasts

Once the fertilized egg implants, your body begins to undergo hormonal changes in order to support the new baby. These changes cause your breasts to feel fuller, heavier and downright sore. This can happen early in the pregnancy, sometimes only one week after conception.

Missed Period

One of the most common signs of pregnancy is a missed period. The lining of the uterus, which usually sheds if no implantation takes place, is now needed for the fertilized egg. Some women actually do have a small amount of bleeding around the time their period is due while pregnant, but it is usually lighter and shorter than usual.

Morning Sickness

Nausea is another of those stereotypical signs of pregnancy although the term "morning sickness" can be misleading. Nausea can happen any time of the day in varying degrees. Some woman are sick all day while others only experience a few hours of nausea. This symptom can crop up at any time during the pregnancy but usually appears within the first eight weeks.

Frequent Urination

Another commonly known symptom of pregnancy is a more frequent urge to head to the bathroom. This is due to your already growing uterus. Even though the baby is still a tiny little thing, your uterus is expanding in order to care for it and is putting pressure on your bladder. This symptom arrives about six weeks after conception and reappears once your belly really starts to grow.

About the Author

Jane Williams began her writing career in 2000 as the writer and editor of a nationwide marketing company. Her articles have appeared on various websites. Williams briefly attended college for a degree in administration before embarking on her writing career.