Seven Steps to Teaching Teen Organization Skills

By Kimberly Turtenwald
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The art of organization is important when dealing with many aspects of life. Some people aren't naturally organized, however, which means they must learn this skill -- or else they'll encounter difficulties when trying to achieve their goals. Teaching organization skills to your children in their teen years can help encourage the abilities needed to be successful throughout high school, college and adult life.

Step 1

Encourage your teen to sit down and work on homework at the same time every day. Help him create a schedule to follow, so everything gets done in a timely manner.

Step 2

Provide him with his own calendar or daily planner -- and show him how to use it -- so he can keep track of his school assignments and their due dates. Giving him the tools he needs to stay organized with his school work will encourage him to stay on top of things he must accomplish, developing skills he'll benefit from throughout his life.

Step 3

Create a schedule together that covers chores as well as sports or other scheduled activities. This will help your teen learn to organize the fun activities around those he needs to do on a daily basis.

Step 4

Set an example for your teen in your own life. Keep your appointments organized on a calendar and create a schedule for yourself. When your teen sees how organization benefits you, it will encourage him to follow your example so he can experience the same success.

Step 5

Help your teen learn the advantage of planning and preparing ahead of time, even with relatively simple, everyday things. For instance, encourage him to pick out his clothing and set out everything else needed for the next day before going to bed, so the morning routine will go much more smoothly with less stress.

Step 6

Show your teen how to break up larger projects into smaller, more manageable pieces -- using a major assignment as an example. Help him determine the main parts of completing the assignment, and then schedule each part on his daily planner. A large project feels overwhelming unless you address one aspect at a time.

Step 7

Ask his teacher for help with teaching organizational skills, if you are having trouble getting through to him. Teachers often know of other ways to reach out to students who need additional help, and may have some insightful pointers for you.

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I have been writing as a hobby for many years now. I am involved with several freelance opportunities for the last 5 years or so. I specialize in web content including search engine optimization and blogs. I pride myself on being able to learn to write various other types of content with little instruction. I currently work outside of the home full time, but have plenty of free time in which to write various articles. In addition to the above mentioned areas, I am capable of writing on pretty much any topic with just a little bit of research. I have always been very good at completing assignments by the deadline and can be counted on to fill in when articles need to be completed ASAP.