How to Remove Diaper Rash Ointment

By April Fox

Diaper rash ointment is a staple of most baby nurseries. It protects baby's delicate skin from irritation caused by wet and soiled diapers, and helps speed healing if your little one already has diaper rash. Applying the ointment to a wee bottom isn't always easy, though. As your baby wiggles and squirms on the changing table, it's almost guaranteed that a bit of the cream will end up where you don't want it. Fortunately, removing diaper rash ointment from both skin and fabric is an easy task.

From Skin

Gather all materials--two washcloths, a basin of warm water and a soft towel--so you can reach them without having to leave your baby unattended.

Use one dry washcloth to wipe excess ointment away. Do not scrub your baby; simply wipe gently. If cleaning around the diaper area, always wipe from front to back.

Soak the other washcloth in warm water, and squeeze out excess.

Touch the damp washcloth to the inside of your wrist, to ensure it's not too hot for your baby. It should be room temperature or slightly warmer--not hot at all.

Use the damp cloth to remove the remaining ointment from your baby's skin. Again, be gentle and wipe from front to back. It's better to go over the area several times gently than to scrub your baby; scrubbing can irritate his delicate skin.

Pat your baby dry with a towel.

From Fabric

Check the garment's care label to be sure it's safe to launder at home. If not, take the item to a professional cleaner, or it may be damaged.

Fill your sink with hot water and a small amount of laundry detergent--about an eighth of what you'd use to wash a full load in a washer.

Soak the garment in the soapy water for 15 minutes.

Rub the stained fabric together, and drain the sink..

Fill the sink with enough white vinegar to cover the soiled part of the garment, and soak the fabric in the vinegar for 15 minutes.

Rinse in hot water, and launder as usual.

About the Author

April Fox has published articles about homeschooling, children with special needs, music, parenting, mental health and education. She has been a guest on Irish radio, discussing the benefits of punk rock on child development, and currently writes for several websites including Carolina Pediatric Therapy.