How to Put Together a Child's Modeling Portfolio

By Sheryl Faber
Shots that reflect a sports theme are often a good choice for portfolio photos.
Shots that reflect a sports theme are often a good choice for portfolio photos.

Your child is adorable, outgoing, very photogenic and you want to get him into modeling. You will need a portfolio to showcase his flexibility and strengths, as well as list his physical details. Pulling all of this together can be a challenge but will be well worth the effort when he begins to appear in print ads or runway events.

Headshot Specifics

One of the most important aspects of your child's modeling portfolio is an 8-by-10 headshot photo. These are photographs from his shoulders upward. This photo should be taken by a professional if your child is 4 to 13 years old, suggests the Business of Modeling website. It should present the youngster just as he is so clients can see his authentic look and personality. Makeup should not be applied and do not create a special hairstyle or use hair accessories for this shot. It should be as simple and as natural as possible. Take the photo in natural, outdoor light or in a room with good lighting. Ensure your child looks into the camera to show that he can maintain eye contact.

The exception to formal headshots is with babies and toddlers. Until the age of 4, you can take your own photos of your child in various poses and surroundings. Agencies understand that small children grow and change so much that it is almost impossible to always have current and professional headshots.

Other Shots and Poses

A full-length body shot that is similar to the headshot is a must for your child's modeling portfolio. This shows your child's stance, posture, body build and proportions. You may wish to add additional pictures of him in sportswear, formal attire and casual clothing, plus a personality shot that shows the subject in his very best and most comfortable environment and most attractive attire.

It is best to select only six to 12 of the very best photographs for the portfolio. The size of the photos included depends on the area standards. For example, New York agencies may require larger sizes such as 9-by-12 photos, while a Miami agency may require smaller pictures. Always find out the agency's requirements before submitting photographs.

Build a Resume

It is not only an adult who benefits from having a resume. Children over the age of 4 who have experience in the modeling business need an updated listing of contact information, past experience, training and education. Any time the child engages in classes or coursework in the modeling industry, these should be added to the listing to help promote him to prospective companies and clients. All the information, including the photos, should be updated with the agency every 6 months and should be ready to take on an audition at a moment's notice. Alternatively, if your child doesn't yet have a resume, send a letter of introduction that is not more than three to five sentences, advises the Business of Modeling website.

Physical Details

Companies will need all of the details of your child included in the portfolio. This should encompass height, weight, shoe size, clothing sizes and body measurements. These need to be updated often. These details assist in determining the sizes of apparel that will need to be on hand for him to model, either on a runway or for print advertising.

The Final Product

Gather all of the information and display it in a quality hardcover, expandable notebook. Ensure that you can add or remove photos and information from the plastic page covers in the portfolio, as needed. Make a point to arrange the photos according to the requirements of a particular client. For example, if the job is for wedding attire, move all of the ring bearer or flower girl looks to the front of the book.