How to get Pregnant Without Fallopian Tubes

By Lauren Farrelly
How to get Pregnant Without Fallopian Tubes

Fallopian tubes are essential to the natural pregnancy process. A woman, however, can still become pregnant with none, or only one fallopian tube. Once an egg is released from an ovary, it is sent into the fallopian tube where it waits to be fertilized. Once it is fertilized, it will move down and implant into the uterus for further development. If a woman has no fallopian tubes, she very well may still be ovulating. However, the chances for a natural conception pregnancy are very slim. Instead, in vitro fertilization will be the best course of action.

Schedule an appointment with your OB/GYN

Schedule an appointment with your OB/GYN to discuss possible fertility options. If you have no fallopian tubes, naturally becoming pregnant through traditional methods will be very difficult.

Your eggs will be frozen and set aside for fertilization with your partner's sperm.

Schedule an appointment to have your eggs harvested. Your eggs will be frozen and set aside for fertilization with your partner's sperm.

Schedule an appointment to have your partner's sperm harvested.

Schedule an appointment to have your partner's sperm harvested. The sperm will be frozen and set aside for fertilization with your egg(s).

Chart your basal body temperature and your monthly ovulation cycle.

Chart your basal body temperature and your monthly ovulation cycle. Your OB/GYN will recommend that implantation of a fertilized egg happen at a certain point during the month for an optimal environment.

Schedule an appointment with your OB/GYN to have the fertilized egg(s) implanted into your uterus.

Schedule a follow up appointment with your OB/GYN for an ultrasound and pregnancy test to check to see if the pregnancy has taken

Schedule a follow up appointment with your OB/GYN for an ultrasound and pregnancy test to check to see if the pregnancy has taken. This will typically happen about two weeks after in vitro fertilization has occurred.

About the Author

Lauren Farrelly has been writing and producing for television since 2003. She has experience covering sports, business news and general news events for CNBC, ESPN and Bleacher Report. Farrelly has a BA in broadcast journalism from Arizona State University.