How to Minimize Teenage Rebellion

By Victoria Thompson
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The adolescent years can be challenging. Your teen may resemble an adult physically, but has not acquired the wisdom to make mature choices. A teen may become rebellious to exert her independence or if she feels threatened. Do not overlook this behavior if your teen's personality changes or wait for it to go away on its own. Rebelliousness could lead to negative outcomes that the teen may not have the maturity to handle or take responsibility for.

Set a Positive Example

Step 1

Exhibit the behavior that you want your teen to follow. Rid the home of any negativity that might cause the teen to misbehave; teens sometimes mirror parental behavior and attitudes.

Step 2

Seek a mentor or role model for your teen if she's not comfortable talking to you. Build a supportive network around her to show that people care about her well-being.

Step 3

Question your teen and communicate with her. Set up a time that you can spend quality time together. Go for a walk or out to a favorite restaurant, so she does not feel attacked by your communication efforts.

Discipline System

Step 1

Create a positive discipline system. Tell your teen that her rebellious behavior makes a discipline system necessary.

Step 2

Make your child aware of rules that are non-negotiable for the household. Assign a consequence each time a rule is broken. Remain consistent so that your teen understands your expectations.

Step 3

Provide rewards when your teen behaves appropriately. Choose rewards that are meaningful to her and consistent with her age and interests.

Get Involved in Activities

Step 1

Meet all of your teen's friends. Invite them into the home so you are aware of the types of people she spends her free time with.

Step 2

Tap into her interests and encourage her to pursue them; they could be academic or sports related. She will feel a sense of accomplishment by spending time with what she does well.

Step 3

Help your child find a part-time job to give her a sense of adult responsibility; having less idle time may decrease her rebelliousness. Working also teaches your teen how to manage a schedule and create a balance between work and play.

About the Author

Based in North Carolina, Victoria Thompson has taught middle school for the past 15 years. She holds a Masters of Education in middle school instruction from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She teaches English daily to English as a second language students.