How to Make a Paper Wolf Mask

By Karren Doll Tolliver
Children can learn about wolves while making a paper-plate wolf mask.

Children enjoy playing make-believe with masks, especially if they have made the masks themselves. With two paper plates and some other art supplies, kids can make their own wolf masks. They can use the masks in a play, as part of a Halloween costume or just for fun. Teachers and parents can teach children about the wolf’s role on our planet, using the masks to augment the instruction.

Hold one paper plate in front of your face and ask an adult or a friend to mark two eye holes where the eyes will be. Cut out the eye holes.

Below the eye holes, cut out a piece of the paper plate about 2 1/2 inches square with one side open at the edge of the paper plate. This section is where your mouth will be when you are wearing the mask.

Cut jagged edges on each side of the paper plate. Start cutting from the bottom corners of the section you cut out in the previous step and stop cutting at eye level.

Glue a 9-ounce paper cup upside-down on the paper plate just above the section you cut out for the mouth. This is the wolf’s muzzle.

Cut two oval ear shapes from the other paper plate and glue each one to the top of the first paper plate above each eye.

Cut two strips from the other paper plate as long as the cup and about a half-inch wide. One long side of the strips should be straight and the other side should be jagged. These strips form the wolf’s teeth, so glue them parallel to each other on the side of the cup above the mouth.

Punch a hole on each side of the first paper plate at eye level. Tie the end of a piece of string through each hole. Put on the mask and use the strings to tie it onto your head.

Tip

Color the paper plates brown or black before you start to make a darker wolf mask.

Cut four or five pieces of fishing line to a length of about six inches. Bundle them together and tie them in the middle. Glue the bundle to the middle of the cup’s bottom to make wolf whiskers.

Warning

Children should always use age-appropriate scissors and other supplies.

About the Author

Karren Doll Tolliver holds a Bachelor of English from Mississippi University for Women and a CELTA teaching certificate from Akcent Language School in Prague. Also a photographer, she records adventures by camera, combining photos with journals in her blogs. Her latest book, "A Travel for Taste: Germany," was published in 2015.