How to Make a Miniature Parade Float

By Doug Hewitt
Make a Miniature Parade Float

Learn how to make a miniature parade float and engage your children in an activity that will stimulate their creative processes and engage them intellectually. For younger children, making a miniature parade float helps make the parades they see on television more real. A great way to spend a rainy afternoon, making a miniature parade float is a fun activity for children and grandchildren alike.

Take a shoebox and attach Styrofoam packing peanuts to the side by using wood glue. Allow the glue to dry.

Turn the shoebox so that the open end is down. Take a black marker and draw wheels on the peanuts. Then use other color markers to make the peanuts colorful. Try to use patterns such as stripes to give your miniature float the look of being designed.

Use toy construction blocks and wood glue to make miniature platforms on top of the shoebox. Add mounds of peanuts to design shapes and other features atop the shoebox.

Tie or glue tinsel to the miniature float to give it a glittery appearance.

Populate your miniature float with dolls or action figures. Set them on the platforms you made with the toy construction blocks. You can design special holiday clothing for them as an extra fun activity for children and grandchildren.

Blow up balloons and tie them to the float. Tie the balloons to sticks attached to the shoebox to simulate a floating effect. Paint faces on the balloons with markers.

Take pictures of your miniature parade float and send to family and friends so that everyone can share in the fun.

Tip

Watch a parade and have the children take notes of floats that they particularly like and want to use as models for their miniature floats.

Warning

Balloons can be choke hazards for infants. Do not leave infants or toddlers alone with balloons.

About the Author

Doug Hewitt has been writing for over 20 years and has a Master of Arts from University of North Carolina-Greensboro. He authored the book "The Practical Guide to Weekend Parenting," which includes health and fitness hints for parents. He and his wife, Robin, are coauthors of the "Free College Resource Book."