How to Maintain a Little Girl's Afro

By Sarah Bourque
Keep your child's hair healthy and cute with a natural afro style.
Keep your child's hair healthy and cute with a natural afro style.

Little girls look adorable with a naturally curly afro hair style. Whether your daughter's hair is thick or thin, wavy or tightly curled, maintaining an afro requires some effort. With the proper hair care regimen, however, your girl will have healthy, shiny locks.

Wash your daughter's hair once a week, using a mild shampoo. Remember that her curls do not need daily washing because that can cause her hair to be dry and more prone to breakage. Choose a shampoo that is sulfate- and paraben-free to avoid hair dryness. Massage the scalp gently with the shampoo to thoroughly remove product buildup and dirt. Rinse thoroughly.

Add about 1/2 to 1 cup of conditioner to the hair, depending on the hair length. Remember that the more soaked with conditioner her hair is, the easier it will be to untangle. Comb out all tangles gently with a wide-tooth comb or pick, right there in the tub. Start at the end of the hair and work your way up for as little pain as possible. Rinse out the conditioner.

Pat her hair gently with a soft cotton towel to remove most of the water. Avoid rubbing the hair, which can cause tangles. The little girl's hair doesn't have to be completely dry.

Pour a quarter-size amount of virgin organic coconut oil, pure argan oil or extra virgin olive oil into the palm of your hand. Rub your hands together, then gently apply the oil to her hair. Next, apply the same amount of leave-in conditioner to seal in the oil. Scrunch the hair by gently squeezing it with your hands, one handful of hair at a time. Squeeze the sections of hair starting at the roots. Add a headband or bow to the style, if desired.

Wrap your little girl's hair up when she goes to bed to keep her hair healthy. Use a silk or satin hair wrap, tied on right before bed.

Tip

Between washes, spray the hair with leave-in conditioner each morning. Gently scrunch the hair with your hand to keep hair fresh and curly.

About the Author

Sarah Bourque has been a freelance writer since 2006 and is based in the Pacific Northwest. She writes and edits for the local publisher, Pacific Crest Imprint and has written for several online content sites. Her work recently appeared in "The Goldendale Tourism and Economic Development Magazine" and "Sail the Gorge!" magazine. She attended Portland Community College where she studied psychology.