Jobs for Teenagers That Are 14 Years of Age

By Jennifer Erchul
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Kids like their own spending money. Some children need to earn their money, whether it is for school lunches or a night at the movies. Most companies do not hire children who are under the age of 16, but there are several job opportunities for teenagers who are 14 years old.

Babysitting

Many children start babysitting around age 12. To get more comfortable taking care of infants and young children, take a babysitting course. This will also make you more desirable to hiring families. In 2010, the starting wage in Omaha, Nebraska, for an inexperienced babysitter was around $7 an hour or $5 per kid. Experienced babysitters earn anywhere from $8 to $12 an hour. This is a lucrative job, and if you enjoy children, it is an honest way to make extra money.

Lawn Service

If you have access to a lawn mower, you can provide inexpensive lawn service to your neighbors. Because people are busy, and tending to their yards is time consuming and labor intensive, many adults pay neighborhood kids to mow and trim their grass, weed their gardens and trim their bushes. You can make anywhere from $10 to $30 dollars for mowing and trimming a single yard. If you do a good job and show reliable, responsible behavior while working, it is likely your neighbor will praise your services to his neighbor, and by mid-summer you could have a booming lawn business.

Pet Sitter

Teenagers who love animals, but are not old enough to get traditional jobs, make exceptional pet sitters. You do not need any extra training or special classes. You just need basic care skills and a willingness to care for animals. Clients may ask you to feed and water their pets, take the dogs for walks, pick up waste or just keep the animal company while the owner is away. To get repeat business, always pick up after the animal and yourself, do not invite friends on your jobs and always be respectful.

Junior Camp Counselor

Many kids' camps hire young teenagers as junior camp counselors. Your role is to assist the counselors with activities, programs and meal prep if needed. This job provides social opportunities and fun activities. Some camps are sleep-away, so you would spend at least one night away from home. Others are day camps, which would allow you to return home each afternoon or evening after the campers leave.

About the Author

Jennifer Erchul has been a freelance writer since 2002. Writing primarily about family and travel, her work has appeared in the "Idaho State Journal," "Portnuef Valley Parents Magazine" and "Western Flyfisher." She writes for numerous websites and is a published author. Erchul studied English and psychology at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn.