How to Paint Reborn Dolls

By Lane Cummings
Artists painstakingly paint reborn dolls to make them look like real babies.

Reborn dolls refer to a very specific type of doll that made by particular doll artists. Often these artists take apart a standard baby doll and repaint it carefully to give it lifelike features, often stuffing it to make it feel heavy like a real baby. Hence, reborn baby dolls often bear the name "living dolls." If you've never painted a reborn baby before, you will need to practice this technique over and over before you get good and are able to start making dolls that truly look like living babies.

Squeeze out a generous amount of lavender paint on to your paper plate, and dip your brush in it. Paint the inside of the legs, head and arms of your vinyl doll with lavender paint using your fan brush. This will neutralise the orange glow that most vinyl dolls have.

Dip a make-up sponge in your red stencil paint and add a dab of natural blush to the chin, cheeks, nose and centre of the forehead of your doll. You just want to add a light stain to create a look of natural redness. Don't overdo it.

Rub the stencil cream in with your fingers to combine it naturally into the doll's face. Repeat this process with the palms of the baby doll's hands and the soles of the feet, as babies have very pink feet and hands.

Dip a small round brush in your red stencil cream and add colour to the lips of the baby's face, blotting on the colour gradually. Add a few blots of colour to the baby's fingertips and tips of its toes.

Study a picture of a real baby and note the redness and discolouration this baby has. For example, the elbows may have red spots on them, as might parts of the neck. Add those discolourations on with the corner of your make-up sponge and your red stencil cream. When finished, allow the baby to dry for 24 hours.

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."