Finger Foods for 10-Month-Old Kids

By Stephen Andrew Baldwin
Crackers are a good finger food for babies.
Crackers are a good finger food for babies.

Around 9 months, your infant will become a self-sufficient little feeder with a will of his own, no longer craving your assistance with mushy foods. Around this time, your infant’s teeth will no doubt be growing in and her motor skills will also begin to develop. Among these skills is being able to grasp objects with his/thumb and forefinger. This might mean more planning and prep work on your part to ensure that your baby is getting the most out of mealtime.

Meals

Usually you can find something from your regularly scheduled lunch or dinner menus that would be just fine for a 10-month-old. Many recipes may require that you cook food a little bit longer to ensure that it is soft enough or simply cut it small enough to prevent choking. Foods such as sandwiches, chicken and hamburgers are all acceptable finger foods for 10-month-olds as long as the pieces are small enough. Rice and pasta dishes are also acceptable as long as you cook them long enough so that they can easily be mashed up in a semi-toothless mouth.

Cereal

Cereal is another popular choice for beginner infant finger foods. This is probably because it’s the easiest to prepare--simply open up a box and put a handful in front your young one. Be careful that you choose cereals that have some nutritional value such as Cheerios or Crunchy Corn Bran, and not just sugary marshmallows.

Sandwich Deconstructed

Cutting cheese in to cubes and shredding lunch meat is as much effort as it takes to prepare this dish. It works because your 10-month-old is likely to take that sandwich apart anyway, so save yourself the hassle of making it and move on.

Fruits

Soft fruits are essential to your baby’s diet. Some great ideas are banana slices, peeled and sliced apples or pears, peeled grapes or cut-up peaches, or cubed melon. The rule of thumb is to choose fruits that are soft enough to be gummed and to cut the pieces smaller if they don’t melt in your mouth naturally, such as watermelon.

About the Author

Stephen Andrew Baldwin became a freelance writer in Seattle, Wash. after graduating from Western Washington University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in creative writing. Focusing professionally on web copy, Baldwin has been writing professionally for more than two years, and has been published on a number of websites including eHow.com.