How Do I Troubleshoot a Smart Cycle?

By Ross Glyn
Troubleshoot a Smart Cycle.

The Fisher Price Smart Cycle is a stationary bike and a physical learning arcade system that plugs directly into your TV. This educational toy is designed for kids ages 3 to 6. By inserting a cartridge into the bike, the system allows kids to pedal as characters guide them through various games and races -- and gives them the exercise they need. Sometimes glitches can occur with the bike and the TV picture; however, there are a few troubleshooting steps you can take before returning the bike to where you purchased it for help.

Check for the low battery symbol on the TV screen. Unscrew the battery cover and replace with 4 D (LR20) alkaline batteries if necessary.

See that the TV or VCR is set to the proper input. Press the channel down button on the TV or VCR. Find an input channel below channel 2. Use the menu system to change to "input" or "source."

Check to see if the plug-and-play cord has been disconnected. Make sure that both ends of the cord are securely connected to your TV or VCR as well as to the bike.

See if the TV aspect ration is set correctly. The image should not be distorted or stretched. Do not use the wide screen option. Check to see if there are black bars on either side of the screen. This will be the correct aspect ratio setting.

Tip

Refer to the owner's manual for more information on changing the aspect ratio on the screen.

The Smart Cycle is designed for indoor use only.

Do not mix old and new batteries or batteries of different types, such as alkaline and nickel-cadmium.

Only one child at a time should ride on the Smart Cycle, and he or she should wear shoes while riding.

Clean the cycle with soap and water only. Do not use any bleach or abrasive cleaners.

To adjust the seat height, remove the seat peg and lower or raise the seat accordingly.

About the Author

Ross Glyn began writing for film and television in 1986. He wrote and directed the film “After The Rain” as well as the play “Soweto's Burning.” He is a member of the Writers Guild Of America, the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Ross holds a performer's degree from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art.