How to Disassemble a Nerf Longshot

By Michael J. Scott

Hasbro manufactures the Nerf brand N-Strike line of toy guns. Each N-Strike gun fires foam darts. One of the guns in this line is the Longshot CS-6. While Nerf toys primarily are marketed to children, some people modify their Nerf guns to allow them to fire darts farther or to fire pellets instead of darts. If you want to modify your Longshot, the first step is to disassemble the gun.

Place your Longshot on a table. Remove the dart magazine by sliding the bolt to the rear of the gun and pressing the release switch on the side of the gun. Pull the magazine out of the receiver. Slide the bolt forward and press the trigger to release the tension in the internal spring.

Use a flat head screwdriver to carefully pry one side of the bolt grip off of the bolt lever. Without removing the bolt lever, the gun will not come apart. The grip is fairly tight, so use a smooth even pressure to work it loose. Once the grip is removed, slide the bolt lever out of the main body of the gun.

Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screws from your Longshot. There are 21 screws on the main body of the gun and an additional seven screws on the shoulder stock. Keep track of where each screw goes, as some are different lengths.

Separate the two halves of the shoulder stock assembly with your hands. With the screws removed, the stock should just come apart with a little pressure.

Separate the two halves of the guns main body with your hands. Like the stock, with all screws removed, the body should come apart easily.

Locate the bolt sled assembly near the back of the gun. It is a long orange cylinder. Remove the retaining screws and pull it out of the main body of the gun. Use a screwdriver to push the metal retaining pin out of the bolt sled assembly and the bolt will come free of the sled.

Remove the screws holding the trigger assembly in place and remove the trigger assembly.

About the Author

Michael Scott is a freelance writer and professor of justice studies at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is a former prosecutor. Scott has a J.D. from Emory University and is a member of the Utah State Bar. He has been freelancing since June 2009, and his articles have been published on eHow.com and Travels.com.