How to Convert a Stroller to Sit & Stand

By Shellie Braeuner
Children grow quckly and need a stroller that meets their needs.

The Sit n Stand is a stroller system designed by Baby Trend, Inc. The stroller accommodates an infant car seat in the seating area. As the child grows, she sits in the seat with a five-point restraint. When the child outgrows the seat, or a new baby is born, the stroller meets the growing family’s needs. In the single-seat model, a small, padded jump seat folds down in the back of the stroller. The older child can stand facing forward, or she can sit facing the parent pushing the stroller. The tandem strollers require removal of the rear seat.

Removing the Rear Seat

Unsnap the rear canopy from the frame of the stroller. Slide the canopy upwards until it is free of the stroller. Set aside.

Unbutton the top and bottom portions of the rear seat from the frame. Unsnap the seat fabric from the frame at the connection points on either side.

Slide the shoulder straps through the D rings in the back of the stroller. Slide the crotch strap through the seat fabric, leaving the crotch strap attached to the frame of the stroller. Pull the crotch strap through to the back of the stroller.

Installing the Jump Seat

Loosen the straps that hold down the jump seat. Remove the pad of the jump seat.

Thread the crotch strap through the slot near the edge of the jump seat. Slide the jump seat pad back into place. Slide the frame of the jump seat into the pocket on the pad. Secure the pad with the Velcro straps provided.

The child can either sit on the jump seat, secured with the a three point harness, or stand on the platform facing forward and holding on to the frame of the stroller.

Tip

The fabric seat and belts are washable on delicate. Store the clean pieces in zippered plastic bags until needed.

Warning

Infants should be able to sit unassisted in the seats. The child must be at least 2 1/2 years old and weigh at least 40 pounds to use the jumpseat or standing platform.

About the Author

Based in Nashville, Shellie Braeuner has been writing articles since 1986 on topics including child rearing, entertainment, politics and home improvement. Her work has appeared in "The Tennessean" and "Borderlines" as well as a book from Simon & Schuster. Braeuner holds a Master of Education in developmental counseling from Vanderbilt University.