How to Care for a Silicone Reborn Doll

By Louise Harding
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Reborn dolls are vinyl, vinyl-silicone, or silicone dolls that have been customized by doll artists from factory manufactured baby dolls. The dolls are stripped to the bare silicone parts and then repainted, rooted with lifelike hair, and the limbs and head attached to cloth bodies weighted to resemble a real baby. Making reborn dolls is very labor intensive and is reflected in the often expensive price tags. Most doll artists seal their dolls with various sealants to protect the applied paints, but reborn dolls require gentle handling and proper routine care to preserve their lifelike qualities.

Brush a silicone reborn doll's hair with a soft bristled baby brush weekly to remove dust accumulation. Reborn hair is individually rooted into the scalp and should not be tugged or pulled. If you need to style the doll's hair, never use a heated appliance. Use moistened fingers to style the hair, wrapping hair around your finger to create ringlets or curls.

Keep the doll away from direct sunlight and immersion or excess water exposure. The doll will fade from sun exposure. If the doll gets wet, remove all clothing and accessories and allow it to completely air dry before redressing.

Stroke the doll's limbs and face with a cosmetic powder brush to gently remove dust. Use a damp flannel cleaning cloth to carefully remove stubborn dust accumulation or other debris. Don't rub with any substantial pressure as this will shine the silicone and make the doll look unnatural.

Use a moist cotton swab to wipe glass or silicone eyes that have accumulated dust in the crevices.

Hold the doll in the same way you hold a real baby. Put a hand beneath the doll's bottom and one behind the doll's neck and head. Because silicone reborn dolls are weighted to simulate a real baby, don't pick up the doll by a limb or the head as this will stress the attached parts and potentially cause damage.

About the Author

Louise Harding holds a B.A. in English language arts and is a licensed teacher. Harding is a professional fiction writer. She is mother to four children, two adopted internationally, and has had small businesses involving sewing and crafting for children and the home. Harding's frugal domestic skills help readers save money around the home.