How to Build a Remote Controlled Robot at Home

By Billy Kirk
robot image by Paul Moore from Fotolia.com

Many desire a remote controlled robot, but few know how to go about do-it-yourself construction. However, a simple remote controlled (RC) robot shares many of the same components as a typical RC car. With an old RC car lying around and a few extra components, you can construct and wire together a fully functional remote controlled robot with no professional tools or previous experience.

Look around your house for any old toys no longer in use-specifically, radio-controlled (RC) cars. These old cars contain many of the parts necessary for your remote controlled robot. Salvage a controller and receiver combo from any of these old RC toys. The receiver is the circuit board at the base of these old toys that receives instructions from the controller, which should be either four-way or higher. Four-way controllers allow for up-down and left-right movement for your robot.

Locate a bare wheel base that is flat and consists of four wheels, or tear down an old RC car and toss away the unnecessary plastic decorative items, leaving only the base. Set aside the battery if it still works.

Glue two pieces of Velcro to the wheel base using professional-strength glue. One Velcro piece should affix to the top center of the wheel base, while the other should affix to the bottom center of the base.

Place your battery on the bottom Velcro piece. This battery should be either lead-acid or nickel-cadmium, although the latter is the more efficient of the two. Attach your receiver from the salvaged RC car to the top Velcro piece.

Attach servos (the motors driving your remote-controlled robot) to the wheel base. Place the servos at opposite ends of the wheel base along the perimeter and directly beside the wheels. Secure the servos in place with dual-lock tape.

Wire the components together through the receiver. The receiver has channels on the end of it, and each component should be wired to one of these channels. In the case of the battery, take its wire lead and connect it to the receiver channel that is labeled either "Batt" or "Battery", depending on your receiver. Each of the two servos should be connected in the same fashion to the receiver, but in directly adjacent channels.

Flip on your controller and give your remote controlled robot a spin. Now that your robot is in working order, you may add any decorative elements you wish to spruce up its appearance.

About the Author

Billy Kirk is an experienced professional writer and editor who has written and published articles of varying topics and varying types including news articles, special features and editorials. He has written extensively for regular online publications as well as blogs. Kirk holds a Bachelor of Arts in media production from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.